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Vaccine efforts still lagging in poorer NYC neighborhoods

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New York City’s poorer neighborhoods are still being left behind in the race to vaccinate against COVID-19, despite promises from Mayor de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo to improve equity, data shows.

Queens’ CitiField ballpark is home to one of the city’s highest-profile vaccination hubs, yet its zip code, 11368, is the third-least vaccinated across the five boroughs, according to an analysis of city data by The Post.

Just 20.2 percent of residents in that zip code — which covers portions of Corona and Flushing — have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, well below the citywide average of 31 percent.

“It’s mind-boggling, it’s unacceptable, it’s beyond ridiculous that we’re having this conversation,” said Queens Borough President Donovan Richards. “This is a matter of life and death for these communities.”

“Zip code and socioeconomic status should not determine whether or not you have access to the vaccine.”

The vaccination hub at Yankee Stadium — a city-state partnership — appears to be having more success, though is still below average. Roughly 29 percent of the residents in its South Bronx zip code of 10451 have gotten at least one shot.

A member of the National Guard carrying supplies at the vaccination hub at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx on February 5, 2021.
A member of the National Guard carrying supplies at the vaccination hub at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx on February 5, 2021.
Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/VIEWpress/Corbis via Getty Images

The Post’s analysis found that the city’s most vaccinated zip code is 11697, which covers the enclave of Breezy Point in Queens, which is home to many cops and firefighters who were among the first groups eligible for vaccination.

According to the data, a whopping 70.3 percent of residents in the largely white neighborhood have received at least one shot.

The rest of the city’s 10 most vaccinated zip codes lie in the wealthy and white Manhattan precincts south of 110th Street, which have dominated the city’s social and political life for decades.

People dining outside at a restaurant on the Upper East Side on March 23, 2021.
People dining outside at a restaurant on the Upper East Side on March 23, 2021.
Photo by Noam Galai/Getty Images

For instance, three-in-five residents who live in 10075 on the Upper East Side have gotten at least one dose so far — and 36 percent are completely vaccinated.

That’s nearly three times the percentage of those vaccinated in New York’s poor and minority neighborhoods, despite city and state efforts to expand distribution, the data revealed.

The Big Apple’s least vaccinated zip code is in Queens — Far Rockaway’s 11691, where just 19.2 percent of residents have received at least one shot.

Diana Ayala, a New York City Council member representing East Harlem and the South Bronx, in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York, U.S., on Tuesday, March 9, 2021.
Diana Ayala, a New York City Council member representing parts of Harlem and the South Bronx, in upper Manhattan on Tuesday, March 9, 2021.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

It narrowly edged out The Bronx’s Hunts Point, where only 19.3 percent of residents have gotten a jab.

New York’s fourth- and fifth-least vaccinated zip codes are in Brooklyn.

Just 20.3 percent of residents in the 11207 and 11233 zip codes that cover East New York and the far eastern sections of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant have gotten a shot.

A patient arriving at St. John's Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway on May 20, 2020.
A patient arriving at St. John’s Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway on May 20, 2020.
REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

The lackluster numbers remain despite weeks of promises and initiatives from Cuomo and de Blasio that promised to make a dent in the problem.

“We need to do vaccine equity. We have to get the black number up. We have to get the Hispanic number up,” Cuomo said Friday at an event in The Bronx. “And that’s what we have been focusing on, and we’re going to continue to focus on. That is job one.”

De Blasio has repeatedly touted mega-sites and pop-up vaccination clinics as ways to more widely distribute the vaccine in poorer neighborhoods where the rates lag.

Mayor Bill de Blasio at a food pantry in Coney Island on March 16, 2021.
Mayor Bill de Blasio at a food pantry in Coney Island on March 16, 2021.
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Officials from both levels of government defended the efforts in response to questions from The Post.

“We are working overtime across the state to ensure vaccines are distributed and administered in an efficient, equitable manner — and the state’s community-specific mass vaccination sites are a critical part of that effort,” said Cuomo spokesman Jack Sterne.

City Hall Press Secretary Bill Neidhardt acknowledged the shortfalls in a statement that again touted the city’s programs: “We’ve launched pop-up sites, canvassing teams and partnerships with houses of worship, but our work isn’t done yet to make sure the neighborhoods hardest hit by COVID are fully vaccinated.”

The results mirror the findings of a previous Post analysis that found wealthy Manhattan neighborhoods were home to a disproportionate number of pharmacies, storefronts and healthcare facilities dispensing vaccinations — making it easier for eligible residents to score shots.

A woman getting the COVID-19 vaccine in the Bronx on March 25, 2021.
A woman getting the COVID-19 vaccine in the Bronx on March 25, 2021.
Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

State officials had initially tightly regulated access to the shots, restricting eligibility by age and job title in an attempt to better ration originally scarce supplies. Local officials, including de Blasio, have campaigned for Albany to relax rules — a wish that Cuomo finally granted Monday, when he lowered the age to 30 and announced all adults will become eligible next week.

The 10 least vaccinated zip codes:

  • Far Rockaway’s 11691 – 19.2%
  • Hunts Point’s 10474 – 19.3%
  • Corona/Flushing’s 11368 – 20.2%
  • East New York’s 11207 – 20.3%
  • BedStuy/Crown Heights’s 11233 (Weeksville/Ocean Hill) – 20.3%
  • Brownsville’s 11212 – 20.7%
  • East New York’s 11208 – 20.8%
  • Laurelton’s 11413 – 21.1%
  • Canarsie’s 11236 – 21.3%
  • Borough Park’s 11219 – 21.3%
  • Rosedale’s 11422 – 21.3%

Additional reporting by Bernadette Hogan

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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

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An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

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The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”

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