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NYC parents seethe at campaign-for-credit offer from Eric Adams

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Forget pay-to-play: for high schoolers, make it campaign-for-credit.

An email seeking teen volunteers for the mayoral bid of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams — and promising bogus “classroom credit” in exchange — was blasted out to parents from Tottenville High School’s official email account this week, despite Department of Education rules strictly prohibiting such political appeals.

“Absolutely outrageous,” furious mom Liz Cutler told The Post. “How desperate of a person do you have to be that you need to enlist teenagers for your own political gain?

“Just call it what it is: a kid pro quo.”

Cutler and the rest of Tottenville’s 3,694 school families received the email Tuesday morning from the school’s dedicated IO Education messaging account. An introductory line explained that it was sent on behalf of Connor Martinez, an Adams campaign consultant and former aide to Mayor de Blasio, according to his LinkedIn page.

The email and an attached flyer were simultaneously posted to the school’s restricted data portals: PupilPath, where students and parents can monitor tests and assignments, and Skedula, a teachers-only scheduling and grading site.

 Liz Cutler  Eric Adams
Mom Liz Cutler was irked by the email requesting help from teenagers.
Helayne Seidman for NY Post

“We are building out a robust program where students … will help us elect Eric Adams to become the next Mayor of New York City!” Martinez wrote.

If it wasn’t bad enough that Adams campaign officials were breaking rules for campaigning inside schools, its offer of “classroom credit” appeared to be a complete fabrication.

Martinez’s missive claimed for those chosen as unpaid “campaign fellows … we are offering classroom credit for participation in the program.”

Assistant Principal William Reynolds, who oversees programming and assessments, said of the credits-for-campaigning deal: “This is the first I’ve heard about it. It’s not a program set up by the school.”

And in fact, Adams’ spokesman Evan Thies admitted, the promise was one the campaign can’t directly fulfill.

“Our campaign is offering young people … the opportunity to gain invaluable experience, which schools and teachers can offer as class credit if they choose,” he said.

Meanwhile, Tottenville’s post ran afoul of DOE rules that have been in place since 2009.

“Using school resources and distributing materials on behalf of a candidate is prohibited,” department spokesperson Katie O’Hanlon confirmed.

In 2017, de Blasio caught heat when officials at another Staten Island high school, Staten Island Tech, used the school’s Facebook page to advertise student “internships” with Hizzoner’s re-election campaign.

Tottenville High School
Tottenville’s post ran afoul of DOE rules that have been in place since 2009.
Steve White for NY Post

Tottenville Principal Gina Battista — who, under the DOE’s no-politics rules, “is responsible for ensuring that unauthorized material is not posted, distributed or displayed” — did not respond to a request for comment.

The school sent a follow-up message to parents late Friday, saying that the campaign email “was sent in error” and apologizing for the “confusion.”



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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

Ferry1

An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

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The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”



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