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New York surpasses 50,000 COVID-19 deaths

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New York’s coronavirus death toll has now surpassed the 50,000 mark, new data shows.

As of Monday morning, a total of 50,017 New Yorkers had succumbed to COVID-19, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Only the state of California, which has more than double New York’s population, has recorded more deaths from the virus, at 58,949 fatalities.

Mayor Bill de Blasio commented on the grim figure of more than 50,000 deaths Monday, calling it a “somber milestone.”

“It’s been such a painful experience of all New Yorkers,” de Blasio said during a City Hall press briefing.

“I think this is a reminder to us to take this disease very seriously,” Hizzoner said. “I think it’s a reminder to us that this isn’t over yet, to follow the data and the science, to follow the precautions that healthcare leaders have been consistently telling us to follow, to not loosen up the wrong way.”

Newly dug graves occupy a cemetery on April 16, 2020 in the Ridgewood neighborhood of Queens, New York.
Newly dug graves occupy a cemetery on April 16, 2020 in the Ridgewood neighborhood of Queens, New York.
Corbis via Getty Images

The news comes as coronavirus cases are ticking up again across the country — with New Jersey and New York suffering the highest infection rates.

Tombstones at Green-Wood Cemetery stand in front of the Lower Manhattan skyline during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brooklyn on Dec. 14, 2020.
Tombstones at Green-Wood Cemetery stand in front of the Lower Manhattan skyline during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brooklyn on Dec. 14, 2020.
Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

De Blasio claimed that in other parts of the country, decisions about reopening “are not about data and science.”

The group Marked by COVID holds a vigil and listens to the stories of people who have lost close relatives from the COVID-19 pandemic in a public memorial for the dead on October 8, 2020 in Greely Square in midtown Manhattan.
The group Marked by COVID holds a vigil and listens to the stories of people who have lost close relatives from the COVID-19 pandemic in a public memorial for the dead on October 8, 2020 in Greely Square in midtown Manhattan.
Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

“We gotta make sure decisions in New York are always made by adherence to the data and the science,” he explained.

A man walks by a memorial for those who have died from the coronavirus outside Green-Wood Cemetery on May 27, 2020 in Brooklyn.
A man walks by a memorial for those who have died from the coronavirus outside Green-Wood Cemetery on May 27, 2020 in Brooklyn.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

“It’s painful, but we do know what we have to do from this point on – we’ve got to get the maximum number of people vaccinated, and we’ve got to stick to the smart guidance that the doctors have given us until were absolutely sure we have turned the corner.”

Candles placed around the Lincoln Center fountain commemorate the one year anniversary of the first death in NYC from Covid-19 on March 14, 2021 in New York City.
Candles placed around the Lincoln Center fountain commemorate the one year anniversary of the first death in NYC from Covid-19 on March 14, 2021 in New York City.
John Lamparski/Getty Images

New York state’s own coronavirus fatalities tracker — which only includes confirmed, but not presumed, deaths — puts the Empire State’s total COVID-19 death toll at 40,330, according to the latest data.

Additional reporting by Carl Campanile and Nolan Hicks



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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

Ferry1

An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

Ferry3

The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”



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