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MTA cancels F and C train service cuts after union lawsuit

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Transit officials are bringing service back to pre-pandemic levels on two subway lines after the union sued to reverse the year-old cuts.

The C and F lines — which have been running on reduced schedules since the start of COVID-19 — will soon resume “full” pre-pandemic service levels, Interim Transit President Sarah Feinberg said during a video conference on Tuesday.

“We’re going to bring back full service,” Feinberg said of the two routes.

“That’s the right thing to do to make sure that all of our C and F riders are getting as much service as they possibly can and as much social distance as possible.”

Subway ridership is hovering around 30 to 40 percent pre-COVID levels, MTA stats show. Feinberg said officials contemplated “right-sizing” service to better match demand — but ultimately decided to provide as many trains as possible.

“We’ve sort of taken that debate off the table for now,” she said — promising the resumption of higher service levels in the next “several weeks.”

New York City Interim president Sarah Feinberg.
Feinberg responded to union calls to end service cuts.
Paul Martinka

F train frequencies will increase by early May, the MTA said — from every eight minutes to every four minutes between trains during rush hour. The resumption of full C line service “may take longer,” an agency rep said.

TWU Local 100 had sued the agency over its move to enshrine the schedules, which the union claimed constituted a “long-term reduction in service.”

Utica Avenue subway station.
Service was reduced on the C and F lines at the start of the coronavirus pandemic.
Paul Martinka

Union officials are “very satisfied” by the decision, Local 100 President Tony Utano said.

“New York needs more subway service, not less,” Utano said in a statement.

The MTA raked in $15 billion from three federal relief bills passed since the pandemic hit.

Subway riders gettin on and off the train.
Subway ridership is hovering around 30 to 40 percent of pre-COVID levels.
James Messerschmidt

“After we won $15 billion in federal aid to save public transit, service cuts are no way to thank essential workers and rebuild ridership,” said Riders Alliance organizer Stephanie Burgos-Veras.

“By restoring frequent service on the C and F subway lines, the MTA is delivering for today’s riders and helping bring New Yorkers back to transit.”

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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

Ferry1

An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

Ferry3

The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”



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