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Man accused of Midtown hate attack ordered held without bail

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The assailant accused of beating an Asian woman to the ground and kicking her in the head while onlookers did nothing was remanded Wednesday night at his arraignment in Manhattan Criminal Court. 

Brandon Elliott, 38, was charged with two counts of second-degree assault as a hate crime and one count of attempted assault in the first degree as a hate crime in an attack prosecutors called “heinous and unprovoked” as they requested he stay behind bars.

“At about 11:40 a.m. Monday morning, the victim was on her way to church when the defendant approached her on the street, cursed at her, told her she didn’t belong here, called her an Asian something … and kicked her in the chest, knocking her to the ground and proceeded to stomp on her head,” Assistant District Attorney Courtney Razner told Judge Paul McDonnell.

“The victim was taken to the hospital for a fracture to the pelvis and contusions to the head and body. She was hospitalized for over a day.”

Elliott allegedly sneered, “f—k you, you don’t belong here, you Asian,” as he mercilessly beat her on the Midtown sidewalk, prosecutors said. 

A public defender for Elliott said nothing in response during the short, five-minute arraignment, aside from confirming they planned to reserve their bail application. 

Elliott, who attended the arraignment via video conference, answered “yes” to a few of McDonnell’s questions but remained silent otherwise. He’s due back in court on April 5. 

“Mr. Elliot is accused of brutally shoving, kicking, and stomping a 65-year-old mother to the ground after telling her that she didn’t belong here,” outgoing District Attorney Cyrus Vance said in a prepared statement. 

“Let me be clear: this brave woman belongs here. Asian-American New Yorkers belong here. Everyone belongs here. Attacks against Asian-American New Yorkers are attacks against all New Yorkers, and my Office will continue to stand against hate in all its forms.” 

Elliott, who’s been living at a Midtown hotel that doubles as a homeless shelter, spent nearly two decades at an upstate prison before Monday’s attack. He was found guilty of murder for killing his mother with a kitchen knife in front of his five-year-old sister in their Bronx home in 2002 when he was 19-years-old. 

The convicted murderer was sentenced to 15 years to life behind bars, but was released on lifetime parole in 2019, a state Department of Corrections official said previously. 

Video of his attack against the woman went viral and sowed nationwide outrage because even though witnesses saw what he was doing, no one stepped in to help the victim.  

Early Wednesday morning, Elliott was arrested by the NYPD. 

Additional reporting by Tamar Lapin and Rebecca Rosenberg

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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

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An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

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The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”

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