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Associated Press won’t use ‘crisis’ to describe migrant surge at border

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The White House still won’t use the word “crisis” in referring to the surge of migrants at the US-Mexico border — and now the Associated Press won’t use the word either.

In an internal memo first obtained by Futuro Media, the wire service told its reporters to only use “accurate and neutral” terms in reporting on the increase — and to “avoid hyperbole in calling anything a crisis or an emergency.”

The situation “does not fit the classic dictionary definition of a crisis,” the AP memo says.

The memo, which the AP posted online in its entirety on Friday, acknowledges that the Biden administration is scrambling to accommodate the growing number of migrant children trying to enter the US.

Earlier this month, data from the Department of Homeland Security showed the administration is 20,000 beds short of what it needs to properly house some 117,000 unaccompanied children expected to cross into the US this year.

“There has been a rise in unaccompanied minors crossing the southwestern US border in the last two months since the start of the Biden administration,” concedes the memo, which was issued by the AP’s “Standards Center.”

But the “rise” has been building since the last eight months of the Trump presidency, the memo says, and current numbers are “roughly equal to the last upturn that occurred in mid-2019,” it says.

On Thursday, The Washington Post also urged that the words “flood,” “surge” and “wave” be avoided, saying in an opinion piece that such words are too often tossed around inaccurately without context.

The Washington Post singled out the AP for its language in describing the border crisis. The piece said that AP Vice President of Standards John Daniszewski has acknowledged that the wire service has incorrectly used military and weather analogies in lieu of more preferred neutral and unemotional language.

Asked about the vocabulary edict, an AP spokeswoman referred a New York Post reporter to Daniszewski’s blog post.

Meanwhile, border control veterans are calling the situation a crisis, even if Biden and his administration do not.

On Wednesday, Vice President Kamala Harris admitted that there is a “huge problem” on the southern border, but she did not use the word “crisis” either.

At his first formal press conference on Thursday, President Biden said he would “be flattered” if migrants were heading north to the US-Mexico border in the belief that “I’m a decent man.”

But migration increases like the one happening now occur “every single solitary year,” Biden said, for reasons involving seasonal weather conditions and circumstances in the migrants’ home countries.



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Suspect arrested in fatal Brooklyn stabbing

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Police have apprehended a suspect in the fatal December stabbing of a Brooklyn man, cops said on Saturday.

The suspect, John Headley, 32, also of Brooklyn, was taken into custody Friday and charged with murder and weapons possession for the Dec. 12 knifing of Ken Baird, 37, police said.

Baird was stabbed multiple times in the chest following a dispute on Crown Street near Utica Avenue in Crown Heights at about 6:40 p.m., police said.

EMS transported Baird to King County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, cops said.

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Man dies after jumping from Staten Island Ferry

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A 53-year-old man died Saturday after jumping from the Staten Island Ferry into the chilly waters of New York Harbor, police said.

NYPD Harbor launch officers pulled the man out of the water after responding to reports of a jumper near the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Manhattan at around 2 p.m.

“He jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock,” an NYPD spokesman told The Post. He jumped off the Ferryboat Andrew J. Barberi, police said.

The unidentified victim was removed to Pier 11 and transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 3:10 p.m.

A newsstand worker said there were “about 50 or so emergency people” at Pier 11 following a valiant effort — which included CPR — to save the man’s life.

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An NYPD spokesman says the 53-year-old man “jumped off the ferry as it pulled away from the dock.”

Michael Dalton

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The 53-year-old man was transported to New York-Presbyterian Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Michael Dalton

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Kemp Lashes M.L.B. as Republicans Defend Georgia’s Voting Law

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Mr. Kemp, who is gearing up to run for re-election in 2022, has striven to re-enter the good graces of Republican voters after becoming a central political target of former President Donald J. Trump because of his refusal to help Mr. Trump overturn the state’s election results last year. A former secretary of state of Georgia who has his own record of decisions that made voting harder for the state’s residents, he is again a key G.O.P. voice leading the charge on the issue.

On Saturday, he repeatedly tried to paint the league’s decision as driven by Stacey Abrams, the voting rights advocate and former Democratic candidate for governor in Georgia who is seen as likely to challenge Mr. Kemp again next year.

Ms. Abrams, one of the most prominent critics of Georgia’s voting law, has pushed back on calls for sports leagues and corporations to boycott the state. She said on Friday that she was “disappointed” baseball officials had pulled the All-Star Game but that she was “proud of their stance on voting rights.”

In defending the law in Georgia, Mr. Kemp singled out two Democratically controlled states, New York and Delaware, and compared their voting regulations with the new law in Georgia. Those states do not offer as many options for early voting as Georgia does, but they have also not passed new laws instituting restrictions on voting.

“In New York, they have 10 days of early voting,” Mr. Kemp said (New York actually has nine). “In Georgia, we have a minimum of 17, with two additional Sundays that are optional in our state. In New York, you have to have an excuse to vote absentee. In Georgia, you can vote absentee for any reason.”

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